Wolverhampton Stories

Hilda Neville Green

The story of Hilda Neville Green initially proved to be a bit of a mystery. Wolverhampton City Archives has a photograph of her, and the only information included with the image was that it was Captain Hilda Neville Green, the Adjutant of the Wolverhampton Women’s Volunteer Reserve.

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Lucy May Eaton

Lucy Eaton was born in Wolverhampton in 1903 and lived in Wednesfield. In 1917, at the age of 14, Lucy was working as a helper in the Assembly Department at the Patent Axle Box Company’s Works, who were based in Wednesfield, at the junction of Hall Street and Well Lane.

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Conscientious objectors

Twin brothers Garnet Round and Gordon Osborn Aston, were born in Cannock in 1885. They moved to Wolverhampton by 1891, when they lived at Newhampton Road. By 1901 they had moved to Penn, where Garnett worked as a Factor’s Clerk and Gordon as a Railway Clerk.

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Life in the Cottage Homes during the First World War

The Cottage Homes were erected in 1890 in Amos Lane in Wednesfield and consisted of eight homes, each for 30 children. They were managed by the Wolverhampton Poor Law Union, which consisted (in 1896) of the townships of Bilston, Heath Town, Short Heath, Wednesfield, Willenhall as well as Wolverhampton.

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